December 1st, 2010

S.C. Hickman

John Ruskin: Pied Piper of Art Criticism

"All copyists are contemptible, but the copyist of himself the most so, for he has the worst original."
      - John Ruskin

How many art critics still read John Ruskin on art, sculpture, landscape, architecture, painting, travel, exhibitions, and learn something from it that is still useful and of value in our age of crass postmodernism?

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S.C. Hickman

Weird Realism: Thinking Against Nature

"Nature is simultaneously a productivity and an infinite set of products responsible for the generation and capability of human subjects and their capacity to think."
     - Ben Woodard, Thinking Against Nature

Our views of Nature, the concepts that guide our ability to think nature - or, for that matter, for Nature to think us, have created many quandaries within the project of Philosophy. One way to understand this quandary is to show how philosophers have viewed Nature. David L. Thompson takes an interesting look at the different ways environmentalism has dealt with the concept of Nature. He starts with how environmentalists have chosen different ways of dealing with the relationship between nature and values(i.e., the is-ought gap).[1] He defines four basic concepts that have ruled this debate within the environmental community as: 1) The Nature Law concept, 2) The Evolutionary concept, 3) The Non-artificial concept, and 4) The Physicalist concept. *See notes below... 
 

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